W. Racine County Health Dept

 

2007 Annual Report

 

Serving the communities of:

City & Town of Burlington

 Town of Dover

 Town of Norway

 Town of Raymond

 Town & Village of Rochester

 Village of Union Grove

 Town & Village of Waterford

Town of Yorkville

ACHIEVEMENTS

Activities and programs offered in 2007 are based on the following health priorities from Healthiest Wisconsin 2010, Wisconsinís current health plan.  Below is a narrative on how the health department addressed these health priorities utilizing grant funding in 2007.

 

          Access to Primary and Preventive Health Services:  Health Care Network, Inc. (HCN) provides free or low cost health care to residents of Racine County who are medically-uninsured and have a limited income.  Health care professionals volunteer their time, and skills to provide services.  In 2007, 553 client contacts were made.  Services provided to clients in 2007 included over 300 medical/laboratory appointments, as well as nearly 100 vouchers for free or low cost medication. 

          Adequate and Appropriate Nutrition: In 2007, 1605 client interactions at the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) program occurred.  This is a 27% increase over 2006.  These nutrition clinics are held at the health department three times a month in partnership with Health & Nutrition Services in Racine.  Our Community Outreach Program provides educational information for WIC parents and activities for the children during each clinic. Educational topics last year included health, safety and parenting tips as well as nutritional guidance. 

          Immunization:  Children enrolled in WIC are a traditionally underserved population for immunizations and their vaccination rates tend to be low.  For this reason, Health Department staff reviews the vaccination record of each child between the ages of 24-35 months of age who attend each WIC clinic.  Our assessment report for 2007 verified that immunization rates for these children were 71% at year-end, exceeding our contracted goal of 60%.

          Environmental and Occupational Health Hazards: In 2007, 717 children in our area received blood lead level testing through private medical offices, public health and the WIC clinics.  The Western Racine County Health Department provided public health assistance to the families of four children identified as being lead poisoned last year.  Services provided to these families by public health nurses include education on lead and nutrition, lead hazard mitigation, developmental assessment of the affected child and visual inspections of homes in which children with elevated blood lead levels reside.  Nurses also ensured that follow-up blood lead testing was completed according to state protocol.  By the end of 2007, only one of the four clientís blood lead level remained above 10mg/dl.   Environmental complaints in general increased 39% in 2007.  This is partly due to the flooding that occurred in August 2007.  Immediately after the flooding, the health department received inquiries regarding health concerns related to flood water contamination and the need for Tetanus vaccine for over 55 flood victims.  Later, assistance involved environmental investigations as well as educating homeowners on remediation of mold issues.  The health department worked in collaboration with the Racine County Emergency Management during the entire process. 

          Existing, Emerging, and Re-Emerging Communicable Diseases: There were no communicable disease outbreaks noted in Western Racine County in 2007 despite the fact that there were gastrointestinal disease (Salmonella and Shigellosis) outbreaks in adjacent communities and neighboring counties as well as a national peanut butter recall last year due to possible Salmonella contamination.   Cases of Genital Herpes, which increased dramatically in 2006, fell 20% last year while cases of Chlamydia increased 17%.  In 2007 the health department began separating communicable disease cases reported by SOGS (Southern Oaks Girls School and Prison) from the Town of Doverís numbers.  Ninety-four percent of reported STDís in 2007 were from the general public.  The total number of communicable diseases reported by the general public, schools and daycares increased mostly due to reported cases of Head Lice, Pink Eye and Scabies.  Strep throat cases were down in 2007. 

       High Risk Sexual Behavior:  Health Department Public Health Educators provided public health educational programs to eighth and ninth grade students in four local school districts.  This service is funded by the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention grant.  Middle and high school students are instructed on the benefits of abstinence, decision-making skills, and consequences of sexual activity, including information on sexually transmitted diseases and birth control methods.  There were 22 teen (15-19 years) births in our area in 2007.  Five percent of all infants born last year were to teen parents, up from 4% last year.  Prior to 2007, our teen birth rate had declined for three consecutive years.  The state average teen birth rate in 2005, the most recent data available, was 9%. 

       Overweight, Obesity, and Lack of Physical Activity:  The health department once again hosted and financially supported, through state grant funding, the popular 8-week Community Fitness Challenge.  In 2007, the sixth year of the program, 41 community groups formed 180 teams totaling 880 participants.  Self reported participant evaluations at the conclusion of the challenge showed a 35% increase in participantís physical activity levels and improvement in healthy eating habits following the fitness challenge.

       Social and Economic Factors that Influence Health:  New Beginnings, our grant-funded home visitation program, has been offered to mostly first time parents since itís inception in 1998.  Two family support workers, one who is bilingual, provide outreach to area families with children agesí birth through five years.  Home visitors utilize the research based Parents As Teachers curriculum and resources to increase the knowledge, skills and resources families need to ensure optimal child and family development. Growth and developmental assessments utilizing the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) as well as car seat checks were also provided to families. 

       Tobacco Use and Exposure:  In 2007, our focus was tobacco-free homes and other environments (ie; automobiles) in which children are present.  Over 100 packets that included information on the hazards of tobacco use and second hand smoke, as well as resources for family memberís interested in quitting smoking, were given to families affected by second hand smoke.

 

 

                                                                                       IMMUNIZATIONS

In 2007, the number of vaccinations given increased 31% over 2006.   This is directly related to the focus of the CDCís (Center for Disease Control) ďPre-Teen Vaccine CampaignĒ launched on August 1, 2007 which affected adolescents ages 11-18.  As children age, the immunity they received from vaccinations administered in infancy and early childhood wane, making them vulnerable to vaccine preventable diseases such as Pertussis, Varicella, and Measles/Mumps/Rubella.  Meningitis and HPV (Human Papilllomavirus) were also recommended.   

 

IMMUNIZATION CLINIC ATTENDANCE

Burlington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

416

Norway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

Union Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77

Waterford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

208

                                                       Total

740

 

 

                        

 

 

 

                                                                           COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

State mandated reportable diseases decreased 24% in 2007.  The most significant decrease was noted in reported cases of Hepatitis C (78%) and Genital Herpes (20%).  Sexually transmitted Chlamydia and Syphilis cases rose, a trend noted nationally.  Diseases reported by Southern Oaks Girls School (SOGS) were separated from the Town of Doverís statistics in 2007 and represented only a fraction of the diseases reported to the health department.  Locally reported diseases increased again this year, indicating good community and local school communication and cooperation.

 

                                                                                      BIOTERRORISM

Two preparedness plans were developed, the Pandemic Influenza Plan and the Mass Clinic Plan, including a rapid medication-dispensing plan. The State Department of Public Health provided Assessment Tools pertaining to Pandemic Influenza and the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) to the local health departments.  From those assessments, work plans were developed to assist the planning team on plan development and exercises.  Community education was also provided at numerous events.  Health department staff attended the Waterford and Burlington Home Shows, Burlington Safety Fair and the Lynch Employee Information Day.  Information distributed focused on Seasonal/Pandemic Influenza and Hand washing.

 

2007 BOARD OF HEALTH

Chairperson:  Diane Baumeister (February 2008-current) Town of Burlington

                          Betty Novy    (June 2005-January 2008) Village of Rochester

Secretary:     Katie Simenson (February 2008-current) City of Burlington

                         Diane Baumeister (May 2006-January 2008) Town of Burlington

Municipal Representatives:

   Ray Gromacki                                      Town of Dover

   Tom Kramer                                          Town of Norway

   Jim Millonzi                                            Town of Raymond

   Sandra Swan                                       Town of Rochester

   Betty Novy                                           Village of Rochester

   Janice Winget                                      Village of Union Grove

   Dale Gauerke                                       Town of Waterford

   Roy Gawlitta/Marge Schutte                Village of Waterford

   Scott Chase                                         Town of Yorkville

Health Officer:  Cheryl Mazmanian

          

 

                   ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLAINTS

Animal Nuisance (includes Rabies)

        77

Beachwater/Swimming Concern

          6

Bioterrorism

          0

Flooding

        42

Food Services

        26

Housing

       13

Insect/Rodent Complaints

        9

Kennel Inspections

       11

Lead

         1

Miscellaneous

         9

Mold

        13

Radon

         0

Refuse

         9

Water Quality/Septic

       16

                                                 Total

      232

 

 

 

                      BLOOD PRESSURES

Burlington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

126

St. Clareís . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67

Tichigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75

Union Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

103

Waterford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . ..

111

     Total

    482

 

 

 

 

            LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH 2007

 

2006

2007

Heart Disease

18.2%

23.9%

Cancers

24.3%

23.6%

Misc.

28.5%

19.0%

Respiratory

3.6%

8.1%

Flu & Pneumonia

3.3%

5.1%

Accidents

6.1%

3.8%

Hypertension

5.0%

3.3%

Diabetes

3.3%

3.3%

Dementias

n/a

3.0%

Cerebrovascular

4.7%

2.8%

Alzheimer's

3.0%

2.3%

Suicide

n/a

1.8%

 

100%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

                            HOME VISITS

City of Burlington

362

Town of Burlington

188

Town of Dover

84

Town of Norway

135

Town of Raymond

98

Town of Rochester

26

Village of Rochester

21

Village of Union Grove

90

Town of Waterford

164

Village of Waterford

151

Town of Yorkville

61

Total

1380

 

 

PER CAPITA COSTS

 

In 2007, the per capita cost for Western Racine County residents averaged $6.09, a 14% increase over last year.  Grant funds totaling $293,310 helped to sustain the initiatives and activities described in this report and off set a major portion of operating costs.  Public health services respond to fluctuating demands but always focus on healthier communities and prevention of disease.

 

 

FUTURE ENDEAVORS

In 2008, we anticipate grant funding of $272,926.  Changes to Wisconsin Administrative Rule HFS 144 effective March 1, 2008 will mandate that additional immunizations will be required for children attending schools and daycares beginning with the 2008/2009 school year.  Vaccines included in the rule change are the Varicella and Tdap (Tetanus, Diptheria and Pertussis) vaccines.  This mandate will allow a phase-in of several grades per year for the next few years until all school age children have received 2 doses of Varicella and 1 dose of Tdap.  The health department is considering adding extra clinics or possibly implementing school-based clinics as a way to capture this age group and keep the numbers at our regular clinics manageable.   Parenting and child development classes will be offered throughout the year during evening hours.  Bioterrorism and readiness efforts will continue, as will our efforts to continued development of the Western Racine County Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP).  This plan is in keeping with the statutes that mandate each local health department involve residents and policy makers to determine the health issue priorities of their community and develop a plan to address those priorities.  It also mandates that we address health disparities and assure inclusion of the voices of diverse population within the community.  This process is to be completed every 5 years.  Community members are invited to participate in this process throughout 2008.